info

Hillside in Al Qosh. Located 50km north of Mosul, it is the only Christian town that survived Daesh. In 2014, Daesh came within three kilometres of Al Qosh before being driven out by the Peshmerga.

×

Hillside in Al Qosh. Located 50km north of Mosul, it is the only Christian town that survived Daesh. In 2014, Daesh came within three kilometres of Al Qosh before being driven out by the Peshmerga.

×

Article 36 is a specialist non-profit organisation focused on reducing civilian and environmental harm from weapons. They mitigates the impacts of armed conflict as well as developing new policies and legal standards to prevent civilian harm from existing and emerging weapons globally.


Anti-personnel landmines were prohibited under the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty, but over eight million landmines still lie active in Iraq. Article 36 partnered with Mines Advisory Group in Kurdistan Region of Iraq to study the impact of airstrikes, cluster munitions, land mines, unexploded ordnance and toxic remnants of war [uranium weapons, chemical agents, dumped fuel and explosives]. Article 36 believe that in the absence of a common international standard for minimising harm and dealing with the environmental legacy of armed conflict, persistent environmental problems will continue to be created, and with them, long-term threats to the health and livelihoods of civilians.


The United Nations Security Council periodically holds an open debate on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, and the UN Secretary General issues a report on the protection of civilians every year. To find out more, please visit their website: http://www.article36.org/

info

Bardarash Refugee Camp in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Bardarash Refugee Camp in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
info

Gulstan, a Kurdish-Syrian refugee in Gawilan refugee camp in Iraqi-Kurdistan.

×

Gulstan, a Kurdish-Syrian refugee in Gawilan refugee camp in Iraqi-Kurdistan.

×

"I lost my brother and my mother in law in Ras Al Ain, Syria. I had to leave their bodies where they were and just leave. They burned our homes and destroyed everything. I fled with nothing. I had to sell all my gold to pay the smuggler to come to Iraq. I was a teacher in Syria – I want to work and I applied to Aleppo to get a new certificate but I can’t afford it. My son went to an English course that I paid for, but I don’t have the money for the certificate. I just want the men to be able to work. We are educated people, and we want to go out – but it is not safe to go back to Syria. After I gave birth I had pain in my eyes and I couldn’t see or concentrate. I went to the clinic and they just gave me painkillers, which didn’t work. I said please send me to a doctor. I asked for a check on my blood pressure, but they said they didn’t have time. I felt they were laughing and treating me very badly. The children are going to the school here, but we don’t want this life in the camp – what is their future? They are the future, and if they don’t have their base of education, when they grow up what will they be?

This war was not our fault – we want to raise our voice, we want someone to listen, and to solve this situation."


Gulstan, a Kurdish-Syrian refugee in Gawilan refugee camp in Iraqi-Kurdistan.

info

Choman Province in the Kurdish Region of Iraq.

×

Choman Province in the Kurdish Region of Iraq.

×
info

Mohammed [20] and Alan [14], refugees from Qamishli city in Syria inside their tent in Bardarash refugee camp.

×

Mohammed [20] and Alan [14], refugees from Qamishli city in Syria inside their tent in Bardarash refugee camp.

×

"Mohammed and I have our own language, and I feel very special because of that. When we left our home I was so afraid for Mohammed. I wanted us to leave the city because I was scared for him. He is the most important person in my life. He's my big brother. When the bombing started, I asked my family to go down to our relative’s basement because I knew we would be safer there. The bombs would not be able to hit Mohammed in the basement. The best way to calm Mohammed down is to make him laugh – when I have the phone, I show him Kurdish comedy on the internet. During the airstrikes, I kept telling Mohammed it's ok, it's ok, I am your brother, and I love you. I kept telling him that we will leave soon and be safe again."


Mohammed [20] and Alan [14], refugees from Qamishli city in Syria inside their tent in Bardarash refugee camp.



info

Children running in the hillsides surrounding Akre.

×

Children running in the hillsides surrounding Akre.

×
info

Sunrise in Akrê.

×

Sunrise in Akrê.

×
info

Cousins from Rojava, Syria play a card game during a powercut at a refugee settlement in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Cousins from Rojava, Syria play a card game during a powercut at a refugee settlement in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
info

Prosthetic limbs in Slemani, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Prosthetic limbs in Slemani, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
info

A demining team in Duhok work on a mine and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) clearance with Mines Advisory Group.

×

A demining team in Duhok work on a mine and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) clearance with Mines Advisory Group.

×
info

Sulaymaniyah, Kurdish Region of Iraq.

×

Sulaymaniyah, Kurdish Region of Iraq.

×
info

demining team in Duhok work on a mine and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) clearance with Mines Advisory Group. Mines Advisory Group Iraq has worked in Iraq since 1992 to make land safe for populations affected by decades of conflict.

Manual mine clearance techniques rely on demining teams working along marked lanes using metal detectors, prodders, rakes and excavation tools to identify, remove and dispose of mines and unexploded ordnance. 

×

demining team in Duhok work on a mine and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) clearance with Mines Advisory Group. Mines Advisory Group Iraq has worked in Iraq since 1992 to make land safe for populations affected by decades of conflict.

Manual mine clearance techniques rely on demining teams working along marked lanes using metal detectors, prodders, rakes and excavation tools to identify, remove and dispose of mines and unexploded ordnance. 

×
info

Amina* and her mother inside their tent at a IDP camp in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Amina’s husband joined ISIS after they married, and was later killed by an airstrike in Mosul after the birth of their first two children. Amina married at 14 after the death of her father, and gave birth to her third child in the very tent I photographed her in.

×

Amina* and her mother inside their tent at a IDP camp in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Amina’s husband joined ISIS after they married, and was later killed by an airstrike in Mosul after the birth of their first two children. Amina married at 14 after the death of her father, and gave birth to her third child in the very tent I photographed her in.

×
info

Munition, held in Dohuk, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Munition, held in Dohuk, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
info

Reshid's scars from being tortured by ISIS. ×

Reshid's scars from being tortured by ISIS. ×
info

Deactivated land mines in Duhok, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Deactivated land mines in Duhok, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
info

ISIS weapons held at a compound in Southern Iraq.

×

ISIS weapons held at a compound in Southern Iraq.

×

“I had two sons who married and then joined ISIS. They were killed too. One child I buried myself, and my brother told me about the death of my other son. All my relatives and my brothers were in ISIS, and they brainwashed the children. Their father was not like that, he was not a terrorist.
I’m a mother. I didn’t want my sons to join ISIS but I couldn’t stop them. It feels better to die than stay alive. They joined ISIS to harm people. They joined ISIS and brought us to ISIS. If they hurt people and did bad things, even though they passed away, I hope and pray they are going to hell. The day I lost my son, I stayed quiet. I didn’t speak to God. God gives, and God takes.” 


Amina's mother inside their tent at a IDP camp in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

info

VS-50 land mine, in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

VS-50 land mine, in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
info

Natural gas burn off in Lalish, Kurdish Region of Iraq.

×

Natural gas burn off in Lalish, Kurdish Region of Iraq.

×
info

Ahmed, a member of the Peshmerga military in Choman Province in the Kurdish Region of Iraq. The Peshmerga, along with their security subsidiaries, are responsible for the security of Kurdistan Region.

×

Ahmed, a member of the Peshmerga military in Choman Province in the Kurdish Region of Iraq. The Peshmerga, along with their security subsidiaries, are responsible for the security of Kurdistan Region.

×

“I love to walk, and I love mountains. I’ve always walked for my health. And my hobby is to be in nature. In the war, I was walking during a dictatorship and in a place of pain. Now when I walk, I walk without the pain. It’s heaven. How could this not be heaven? Before we had no right to breathe but now we’re free. Imagine, at the top of this mountain where we’re walking was an Iraqi military base. Now you see they’re free. The mountains are free. We sacrificed our blood to be free. I sacrificed my blood. And here I am, walking again”. 


Ahmed, a member of the Peshmerga military in Choman Province in the Kurdish Region of Iraq. The Peshmerga, along with their security subsidiaries, are responsible for the security of Kurdistan Region.

info

A shepherd on a hillside in Al Qosh. Located 50km north of Mosul, it is the only Christian town that survived Daesh. In 2014, Daesh came within three kilometres of Al Qosh before being driven out by the Peshmerga.

×

A shepherd on a hillside in Al Qosh. Located 50km north of Mosul, it is the only Christian town that survived Daesh. In 2014, Daesh came within three kilometres of Al Qosh before being driven out by the Peshmerga.

×
info

Sculpture of Peshmerga in Duhok. The Peshmerga, along with their security subsidiaries, are responsible for the security of Kurdistan Region.

×

Sculpture of Peshmerga in Duhok. The Peshmerga, along with their security subsidiaries, are responsible for the security of Kurdistan Region.

×
info

Educational programme for child refugees inside Bardarash camp.

×

Educational programme for child refugees inside Bardarash camp.

×
info

Talal and his son inside their home in Tulaband, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Talal and his son inside their home in Tulaband, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

"When we came back at the end of 2016 I checked the house. I was careful about opening the door because I knew that ISIS were putting IEDs everywhere. I parked my car at the temple up the hill and walked down the road looking out for IEDs. I went up the stairs to overlook the indoor courtyard of the house, and I saw 2 IEDs there in the middle of the courtyard – there were these two blocks wrapped in blankets, and I didn’t know they were IEDs at first, but looking down carefully I could see wires coming out of them. So, I put a sign outside marking the house to try and make sure people would recognise that it was dangerous and didn’t try to come in. When I came back next time, I saw two of my brothers’ homes were destroyed. ISIS even put IEDs in people's fridges. The Peshmerga cleared some of the hazards, then MAG came and started their work. If not for them, we wouldn’t have been able to farm for next year. From here to Hamdaniyah, they have cleared everything – without this work no one would have come back. We were very scared of returning at first and we would walk together holding hands very closely. As people have returned, it has become more secure. We feel secure right now but not 100% - but thank god we are living our life back here."


Talal inside his home in Tulaband, Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

info

Amena, a Kurdish-Syrian refugee in Gawilan refugee camp  in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×

Amena, a Kurdish-Syrian refugee in Gawilan refugee camp  in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

×
Using Format