In 2017, I visited Asia's largest taxidermy museum owned by Rahmat Shah. Shah, an Indonesian businessman, and trophy hunter is the head of Indonesia's zoo association. As Sumatran-based conservationists push for policy changes; they are met by the likes of Shah who place personal profit above conservation.


Sumatra is home to orang-utans, sun bears, rhinos and tigers, all of which are endemic to the island and remain critically endangered. In the city of Medan in Sumatra, Indonesia, Shah owns a squalidly kept zoo and, within 20km, a taxidermy museum known as Rahmat International Wildlife Museum and Gallery. There are more than 2,500 visibly displayed taxidermied animals, ranging from critically endangered pangolins to Sumatran tigers and Shah has personally shot many of the specimens. Held under the false guise of conservation hunting, Shah's museum is a testament to one man's greed.


Note: I did not pay the entry fee to the museum.

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Zebra and lion at the 'Africa Collection'

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Zebra and lion at the 'Africa Collection'

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Sumatran tigers

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Sumatran tigers

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Juvenile white tigers

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Juvenile white tigers

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A family of Sumatran orangutans

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A family of Sumatran orangutans

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Trophy hunted zebras

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Trophy hunted zebras

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Big cats enclosure

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Big cats enclosure

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Polar bear, brown bear and lynx at central display.

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Polar bear, brown bear and lynx at central display.

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Sumatran lizard collection

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Sumatran lizard collection

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Trophy hunted zebras

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Trophy hunted zebras

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Unknown snake species

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Unknown snake species

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Giraffe at the 'Africa Collection'

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Giraffe at the 'Africa Collection'

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