info

Four sisters plait each other's hair in the town of Kut, Iraq. 

×

Four sisters plait each other's hair in the town of Kut, Iraq. 

×
info
Bibi Mehri rides her horse across the Zarak river in the Zagros mountains. Elder women who are highly skilled and respected are named "Bibi" [meaning deeply respected] within their sub-tribes. Bibi's will own a gun, and become the leader of the tribal family. ×
Bibi Mehri rides her horse across the Zarak river in the Zagros mountains. Elder women who are highly skilled and respected are named "Bibi" [meaning deeply respected] within their sub-tribes. Bibi's will own a gun, and become the leader of the tribal family. ×
info

Relatives of patients await news at a general hospital treating poorer, vulnerable communities in Baghdad.

×

Relatives of patients await news at a general hospital treating poorer, vulnerable communities in Baghdad.

×
info
Alboorz begins to move Mohammad's flock of sheep towards the mountain pass as the sun rises in the Zagros mountains. ×
Alboorz begins to move Mohammad's flock of sheep towards the mountain pass as the sun rises in the Zagros mountains. ×
Children behind fabric during Arbaeen pilgrimage by British photojournalist photographer Emily Garthwaite
info

Al Hillah, Iraq


×

Al Hillah, Iraq


×
mother
info

My mother, Camilla

×

My mother, Camilla

×
info

Basra train platform. The night train from Baghdad to Basra is all that remains of a one-time rich heritage of passenger rail travel in Iraq. An early tram system was replaced in 1914 by an Ottoman track running north from Baghdad, and eight years later the invading British constructed a narrow-gauge line to connect the southern port city of Basra.

×

Basra train platform. The night train from Baghdad to Basra is all that remains of a one-time rich heritage of passenger rail travel in Iraq. An early tram system was replaced in 1914 by an Ottoman track running north from Baghdad, and eight years later the invading British constructed a narrow-gauge line to connect the southern port city of Basra.

×
info
Abu Eisa's daughter outside their family home in the Hawizeh Marshes, Iraq. In the background, the gas burnoff lights the night sky. ×
Abu Eisa's daughter outside their family home in the Hawizeh Marshes, Iraq. In the background, the gas burnoff lights the night sky. ×
info

Among cole flowers in Rojava, Syria

×

Among cole flowers in Rojava, Syria

×
info
A Yazidi woman folk musician stands with a tradition daf drum inside AMAR Foundation’s Yazidi Music Project building in Khanke refugee camp, Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021. (EmilyGarthwaite/NPR) ×
A Yazidi woman folk musician stands with a tradition daf drum inside AMAR Foundation’s Yazidi Music Project building in Khanke refugee camp, Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021. (EmilyGarthwaite/NPR) ×
info

Nafisa pulls back her curtains in  a remote village in the Kurdistan region who have been displaced multiple times over the past one hundred years.

×

Nafisa pulls back her curtains in  a remote village in the Kurdistan region who have been displaced multiple times over the past one hundred years.

×
info

Boys play inside a washing vat in Dhobi Ghat, Mumbai

×

Boys play inside a washing vat in Dhobi Ghat, Mumbai

×
Chained elephant abuse at night in Varanasi India by British photojournalist photographer Emily Garthwaite for wildlife photographer of the year
info

An Asian elephant stands visibly traumatised, chained to a temple pillar following a six-hour procession. It was paraded through the streets of Varanasi, noisy with crowds and rocketing fireworks, in the build up to Diwali, the festival of lights. The elephant was swaying and its bloodshot eyes swirled, as its owner looked on anxiously. There are an estimated 3,600 domesticated Asian elephants in India, belonging either to the government, wealthy families or temples and used in festivals throughout the year. They are an endangered species, their wild counterparts under threat from habitat loss and conflict with humans in agricultural areas.

×

An Asian elephant stands visibly traumatised, chained to a temple pillar following a six-hour procession. It was paraded through the streets of Varanasi, noisy with crowds and rocketing fireworks, in the build up to Diwali, the festival of lights. The elephant was swaying and its bloodshot eyes swirled, as its owner looked on anxiously. There are an estimated 3,600 domesticated Asian elephants in India, belonging either to the government, wealthy families or temples and used in festivals throughout the year. They are an endangered species, their wild counterparts under threat from habitat loss and conflict with humans in agricultural areas.

×
info
Abu Haider and Umm Haider in the Central Marshes near Chibayish, Iraq. ×
Abu Haider and Umm Haider in the Central Marshes near Chibayish, Iraq. ×
girl punching karate at Nari Gunjan in Bihar India by British photojournalist Emily Garthwaite
info

Khushboo is from the Musuhar caste, one of the most marginalised communities in India. The threat of child marriage and trafficking is critically high amongst these communities. Female empowerment organisations like Nari Gunjun provide support, safe houses and education for young girls. Khushboo now lives at Nari Gunjun's boarding school in Bihar and has won nationally in karate.

×

Khushboo is from the Musuhar caste, one of the most marginalised communities in India. The threat of child marriage and trafficking is critically high amongst these communities. Female empowerment organisations like Nari Gunjun provide support, safe houses and education for young girls. Khushboo now lives at Nari Gunjun's boarding school in Bihar and has won nationally in karate.

×
info
Young boys play in the Tigris close to Duthuloiya, during Ramadan in the final hours before the breaking of the day's fast. Duthuloyia is one of the few parts of the Tigris north of Baghdad where the river is accessible recreationally. ×
Young boys play in the Tigris close to Duthuloiya, during Ramadan in the final hours before the breaking of the day's fast. Duthuloyia is one of the few parts of the Tigris north of Baghdad where the river is accessible recreationally. ×
Sun bear in Sumatra Medan by British photojournalist Emily Garthwaite for wildlife photographer of the year
info

Sun bear in Medan, Sumatra. Sun bears are the world’s rarest bears, yet are commonly exploited for their gall bladders and bile. In traditional Chinese medicine the bile is thought to treat a range of ailments, from hangovers to hepatitis. Cubs are farmed, sometimes living permanently with a catheter used to drain the bile.

×

Sun bear in Medan, Sumatra. Sun bears are the world’s rarest bears, yet are commonly exploited for their gall bladders and bile. In traditional Chinese medicine the bile is thought to treat a range of ailments, from hangovers to hepatitis. Cubs are farmed, sometimes living permanently with a catheter used to drain the bile.

×
info
Abulfayz comes to terms with losing five of Mohammad's sheep. Mo Abulfayz comes to terms with losing five of Mohammad's sheep. Mohammad blames him for not counting them before we climbed to 3,200 metres. ×
Abulfayz comes to terms with losing five of Mohammad's sheep. Mo Abulfayz comes to terms with losing five of Mohammad's sheep. Mohammad blames him for not counting them before we climbed to 3,200 metres. ×
Using Format